Android tablet gains in market share does not seem to be translating into dollars for publishers, at least not yet

The common wisdom among publishers and digital publishing solution providers has been that when developing new tablet editions one should develop for iOS first, then Android and other platforms. The reason at first was simply that Apple was first with a popular tablet, and their sales dwarfed the competition. But as more Android, and then Kindle Fire, tablets appeared in the market the reason shifted somewhat: publishers were still seeing far more sales, more paid subscriptions from iPad owners than from owners of other tablets.

january2010-AppleThe theory for why this was true was that Apple had the top end of the market, first adopters, and those with more disposable income. Apple also had a system that allowed for easy purchases – and they also had all those credit cards on file.

But things have changed in the past year or so. Amazon.com launched the Kindle Fire for the holiday season and along with the tablet came a whole infrastructure that resembled Apple’s. Just as iPad owners were used to buying music and movies from iTunes, Kindle Fire owners were used to buying books and other goods from Amazon.com.

Nonetheless, there remains big differences in the way the various platforms are used and the kinds of publications seen inside the app stores. Replica editions are everywhere, but interactive magazines are more often found in Apple’s ecosystem. Many new tablet magazine vendors continue to choose to launch their solutions first for iOS and only later for Android and Windows. TNM’s own survey of digital publishing platform companies shows that close to 25 percent still do not provide solutions that will result in an app for the Google Play store – and close to 75 percent don’t service the Windows environment.

But surely we are starting to see this change, right? With so many new Kindle tablets being sold, with the soon to be released Kindle Fire HDX around the corner, are we seeing, or at least anticipating a change to the market?

YutakaTsutano-iPadCase

Photo by Yutaka Tsutano (used under Creative Commons license)

“What we see is that there is still very much a stickiness to the iOS platform,” Alex Gruntsev, Chief Innovation Officer, NewspaperDirect, said.

Gruntsev said that the iPad reached people who were early adopters. He sees Android tablets, though, as being in the same category as the iPad, but that users remain more price sensitive.

“Amazon is moving the needle now,” said Graham Farrar of zuuka Group, the maker of the iStoryTime apps and bookstore app. “Which is not a surprise to me, if there is one Amazon know how to do is run a store.”

“As the Kindle Fire, and I think the Kindle Fire HDX, will accelerate this (growth),” Farrar said, though “it’s not iOS money yet.”

“When the Kindle Fire was released about 18 months ago I think that spurred additional uses of devices,” said Lynly Schambers, Group Product Marketing Manager, Digital Publishing Suite, Adobe, “because they were that much more affordable and accessible to people.”

“What we’ve seen, when we look at the growth of the Digital Publishing Suite business, we’ve seen the number of downloads really accelerate, especially over the past six to 12 months,” Schambers said.

Mike Haney of Mag+ said he thinks there may be regional differences, as well.

“I have read that there are real regional differences here—where Android is much more common in Europe and other parts of the world, users tend to spend more,” Haney said. “I hear that many of our customers are having good success on the Kindle, where people are more accustomed to buying content, particularly content to read.”

“I don’t know how soon, but the trend seems to be that like app spending everywhere, spending on Android is picking up, not slowing down. Google has done some nice work in improving the layout and features of its app store, and as more of those Android users—who may not have consciously purchased an Android phone, but rather took the least expensive smartphone their carrier offered—”discover” apps on their device, I think we’ll see spending steadily increasing, even if the price per app or per in-app purchase is driven down,” Haney said.

“We are seeing an increase in the number of people that are willing to pay for content, especially when we look at that year over year,” Adobe’s Schambers said. “Just in the past 12 months we’ve seen the number of digital subscriptions, paid for digital subscription increase almost three times over the past 12 months.”

For Gruntsev from NewspaperDirect, he sees a big difference between what readers are willing to pay for on tablets, and online.

“People are not willing to pay for repurposed web content,” Gruntsev said. “The moment they see replica for some reason it triggers comparison to the print.” (And hence a willingness to pay.)

KindleFire-apps-lg

For Haney from Mag+ he still puts the emphasis on the need to think of the new digital publications fresh.

“Our advice is unequivocally that you need to think of your presence on a tablet or smartphone app as a new product, not just a version of an existing product,” Haney said. “It is a unique ecosystem, with unique usage patterns and unique user needs.”

“If you run a monthly magazine and your publisher asks you to make a book, you wouldn’t just slap a hard cover on the July issue and call it done, would you?”

Haney also says that publishers need to understand that on tablet devices, as elsewhere, they are competing for the attention of the user. “Your replica that you clearly put no effort into is not going to lure me away from Zite or Facebook. ut if you give me a compelling bundle of content that is engaging and easy to consume and fits what I do with that device — Atlantic Weekly being a great example — then you will become part of my app habit.”

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A third read tablet magazines ‘cover to cover’

Esquire: Hearst's tablet edition
Esquire: Hearst’s tablet edition
Almost one third of consumers read tablet editions of magazines “cover to cover” and few jump around apps using interactive tools, according to research from Hearst Magazines UK released to Media Week today.Hearst used an in-app survey in digital editions of Harper’s Bazaar, Men’s Health, Red, Elle, Cosmopolitan and Esquire to quiz nearly 500 readers on their reading preferences for digital editions.Of the people questioned, 31.4 per cent said they read a digital issue “cover to cover” in a linear manner.In contrast, only 7.3 percent said they scrolled through small thumbnails of the pages to navigate the app, while 6.4 per cent use navigation features on the front cover or contents section to jump to certain articles.On average, readers claimed to pick up a digital copy and read it four times per issue and read an average of 67.8 per cent of their copy.

In comparison, print readers claimed to read 76.2 per cent of a print copy of a magazine according to the Quality of Reading survey from the Professional Publishers’ Association (then the Periodical Publishers Association) in 2000.

Consumers claimed to spend 103 minutes reading the digital edition, nearly double the amount of time readers claimed to spend on a print issue in the separate PPA research 13 years ago.

When asked what features would enhance advertising, the top two choices were a clickable link to find more about a product (chosen by 30.7 per cent as a feature they would definitely like in advertising) and photo galleries (27 per cent).

Max Raven, the group revenue director of Hearst Magazines UK, said: “Developing robust digital edition metrics and ensuring our advertisers and clients have the utmost confidence in our data is top priority.”

The research also found that 69.1 per cent keep a digital magazine for future reference, while only 11.3 per cent delete it.

Nearly half (45.7 per cent) claimed they intended to buy a mixture of print and digital issues in future.

The digital editions used were enhanced editions, re-designed for devices like iPad and iPhones, rather than a digital version of the print magazine created from PDF files.

Respondents surveyed had a medium age of 37. The survey suggested uptake of digital editions is still on the rise, as 23 per cent of those surveyed were first-time buyers of the edition. The largest proportion (48 per cent) was subscribers.

Hearst claims to be the largest digital publishing in the UK – added together, its digital editions have a larger circulation than any other publisher, according to the latest Audit Bureau of Circulations figures.

In September Hearst launched an Esquire Weekly app edition, a digital weekly edition of the monthly men’s magazine, priced at 99p.

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Elsevier selects Inkling’s digital platform for Expert Consult and Student Consult

PHILADELPHIA, SEPTEMBER 9, 2013 — /PRNewswire/ —

Medical education and reference content to be enhanced by new, intuitive digital platform

Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, has selected Inkling, the creator of engaging, intuitive digital books for some of the world’s most respected publishers, to power the next generation of its popular Expert Consult andStudent Consult medical reference and medical learning platforms.

All of Elsevier’s leading medical reference and learning content will be available through Inkling’s standard-setting reading and search experience. Both existing and new users will enjoy easy search, consistent structure, rich media, social and community features, and seamless electronic access from any device.

“This is a big step forward in the transition from print to digital publishing,” said Matt MacInnis, Founder and CEO of Inkling. “We’re migrating this valuable knowledge to a more flexible, more searchable format and, in doing so, making it possible to build whole new ways for people to find knowledge. Clearly, this is what tech-savvy physicians and medical students demand.”

As part of this agreement, Elsevier will bring more than 650 leading medical titles to Inkling and will use Inkling Habitat, the industry-leading cloud publishing platform, to build and manage this content so that it’s consistently structured, searchable, and easily updated. Expert Consult and Student Consult users will enjoy the Inkling features medical professionals and students around the globe have come to expect – truly interactive content that brings new meaning to illustrations, and allows readers’ annotations to travel across their devices and be shared with others.

Current Expert Consult and Student Consult users will be automatically upgraded to the new experience. New and returning customers can buy access to specific topics, individual chapters, and complete content sets directly on ExpertConsult.com and StudentConsult.com. In addition, customers who choose to buy physical books will also be granted access to the digital experience. No matter how customers choose to buy and use their medical content, the improved Expert Consult and Student Consult experience will enhance the way they find and learn from medical knowledge.

“Inkling’s technology platform, coupled with our extensive library of medical content, paves an exciting path forward for how we curate and distribute medical knowledge,” said Linda Belfus, Senior Vice President for Content, Elsevier. “We believe our customers will appreciate the interactivity, robust features and functionality, and convenience of the new Expert and Student Consult platforms.”

The content will also be available for purchase through Inkling.com alongside the existing catalog of Elsevier medical content. Inkling plans to roll out hundreds of additional digital titles, ranging from oncology to psychiatry, pediatrics to emergency medicine, and more, throughout 2013.

The new Expert Consult and Student Consult experiences will be available early in the first quarter of 2014.

About Inkling

Inkling is a pioneer in cloud publishing, reimagining the book and providing the technology to organize and distribute expert knowledge. Through Inkling, the world’s leading publishers are building their best content into interactive and engaging experiences. Inkling is moving an entire industry forward, creating the infrastructure to transform words on paper into content in the cloud. Based in San Francisco, Inkling is backed by Sequoia Capital and partners with the world’s leading publishers. For more information, visit http://www.inkling.com.

About Elsevier

Elsevier is a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services. The company works in partnership with the global science and health communities to publish more than 2,000 journals, including The Lancet and Cell, and close to 20,000 book titles, including major reference works from Mosby and Saunders. Elsevier’s online solutions includeScienceDirectScopusSciValReaxysClinicalKey and Mosby’s Suite, which enhance the productivity of science and health professionals, helping research and health care institutions deliver better outcomes more cost-effectively.

A global business headquartered in Amsterdam, Elsevier employs 7,000 people worldwide. The company is part of Reed Elsevier Group plc, a world leading provider of professional information solutions. The group employs more than 30,000 people, including more than 15,000 in North America. Reed Elsevier Group plc is owned equally by two parent companies, Reed Elsevier PLC and Reed Elsevier NV.

Their shares are traded on the London, Amsterdam and New York Stock Exchanges using the following ticker symbols: London: REL; Amsterdam: REN; New York: RUK and ENL.

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Newspaper Companies Can Learn from The Guardian Digital Archive

Newspapers often do not have a long shelf life at your local library and often disintegrate over a long period of time. The Guardian and Observer newspapers have been documenting worldwide news since 1791. If a reader wanted to peruse an old issue and read about life on the battlefields of the Napoleonic Wars or the first Wimbledon, suffice to say it would be very hard to locate the original printed version. The Guardian relaunched their digital archive in late 2012, which provides 1.2 million replica pages, 13 million articles and 7,000 photographs. Most newspaper companies do not have such a storied history of content, but selling archived back-issues is good business.

There are no real statistics in the newspaper industry on who provides digital archives and who does not. The largest papers all do, and most offer different payment models to monetize the process and actually make some solid long-term revenue. Digital is growing, and a recent report by the Alliance of Audited Media states that 20% of all online newspapers in the US are digital. Obviously, the entire print sector is not doing too well and there is some debate on how to make money in digital. Some consider paywalls, which allow people to read a few articles for free a month, and then require them to subscribe, and others maintain a fleet of apps. The Guardian presents an interesting case study on how to do something unique.

The Guardian distributes their digital archives from the ProQuest Historical Newspaper program. This is the same company that major papers, such as The New York TimesThe Globe and MailThe Times of India and The Jerusalem Post use. Companies can upload replica editions in PDF form to their accounts and develop their own subscription or charging method. The Guardianhas developed some tiered access levels, such as a 24 hour pass for £7.95 or a 1 month subscription for £49.95. Users can browse for content using the  advanced search engine, which readily supports finding pictures, articles, or any individual section. Once readers discover the content, they can read a free sample to get a sense for it.

The New York Time, on the other hand, does something completely different while using the same ProQuest platform. They do not have advertisements, pictures, charts, or any illustrations. Consumers actually pay a different department to manually scan and email them out. Articles from 1923 to 1986 are available for purchase at $3.95 each. Articles published before January 1, 1923 or after December 31, 1986 are free, but they count toward the monthly paywall viewing limit. A current Times subscriber, is allowed 100 issues a month.

Aside from ProQuest, there are a number of archival websites available online. The biggest digital newspaper site on the Internet is the for-profit Newspaperarchive.com, with 130 million pages. Newspapers.com, a subsidiary of genealogy-titan Ancestry.com, has 34 million newspaper pages. There is also a stalwart hero, based in New York, that has created a website with 5 million, his story is here.

There are currently 419 national newspapers being published worldwide. There are also around 22,000 local and specialty editions being made on a daily or weekly basis. There does not seem to be a cohesive model for digital archives, as some companies just distribute through their own websites or use third party services. Most newspaper publishers interviewed were actually surprised by the interest in their archival strategies, as it’s something that internally is rarely discussed. In a world of sagging print revenues, investing in a solid archive solution is something all papers should consider. The investment costs of scanners is fairly paltry and only a few computers are needed, while outsourcing the sales gives newspaper companies a fairly low overhead.

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Five reasons why you should attend the FIPP Congress in Rome

Chris Llewellyn, president and CEO of FIPP – the worldwide magazine media association, gives five of the many reasons you should attend the FIPP Congress from 23-25 September 2013 in Rome, Italy.

Register to attend today at www.fippcongress.com.

1.    Learn and build long-lasting international relationships:
I went to my first FIPP congress in 1987 in Paris as a bright, thrusting young executive, as the research director for Emap in London, working on new project developments. I met really clever people from around the world talking about case studies and magazine industry trends, and I discovered two things. One was that the presentations themselves really opened your eyes. For a national publisher suddenly to realize that there was a bigger world out there was very exciting. The second thing was unexpected – I realized that the congress was a great networking event. I met people there that I’ve stayed in touch with for a long, long time.

2.    Meet influencers. Do business:
The FIPP World Magazine Congress is the place where the industry’s most important people gather, and the programme addresses the hottest topics in the magazine media industry, bearing in mind that the reason FIPP exists is to keep members informed so they can create better businesses. At the World Magazine Congress there will also be conversations that lead to business opportunities. When I was running around the world with FHM, I went to the congress in Hamburg in 1999, and my colleague Simon Greaves and I did seven deals. That element of doing business has always been there. The beauty of the congress is that it’s the decision-makers who go. You’re not talking to people who have to go back and get permission. I fully expect that more deals will be done.

3.    Consider the hottest industry trends:
I’ve noticed a significant shift in the last six to nine months, in that the way the consumer is demanding digital content is moving faster than some publishers expected it to move. The analogue world, the print world, still has opportunities and magazines are still being launched. But the trend that I don’t think all publishers have realized is the speed of change – the consumer wants content in a digital form. Furthermore, the Congress will also host a commercial exhibition, where you will learn from and be able to engage with leading industry service providers from around the world (note: the exhibition area is already sold out!).

4. Learn with and from B2B publishers:
B2B publishers saw the digital train coming. Consumer publishers have got a lot to learn from the B2B experience. That’s why at the Rome conference we’ve introduced more sessions to allow more B2B experiences to be discussed. The message I want to get over is, our digital future is no longer in the future – it’s our digital present. If you’re not experimenting with digital now, you’re too late.

5. It’s Rome!
Rome is a tremendously popular destination. I go around the world speaking to people, and they’re very excited about going there. The social side of the conference will be set against the background of the eternal city. What’s there not to like?

To learn more about the speakers, programme, sponsors and exhibitors and glamorous Congress opening and closing gala dinners – or to register – go to www.fippcongress.com. Or contact FIPP’s event manager Claire Jones for more information on this unforgettable event.

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Conde Nast launches new subscriber service with Amazon

Conde Nast is the first magazine publisher to collaborate with Amazon on this type of service, a move that will simplify and eventually save money on its subscription process and give it access to a huge new customer base. Currently, subscriptions involve direct mail and stacks of magazine insert cards.

Amazon will allow consumers to purchase, manage and renew their subscriptions for seven of its top titles under a new “all access” plan that gives them both print and digital editions of select magazines using their Amazon accounts.

For the time being, readers can still subscribe using the old paper-based method, but the idea is that Amazon will eventually handle all Conde Nast’s magazine subscriptions if the arrangement is successful.

For Amazon, it marks a new step into handling content, following forays into film and lending books. It gives the online retailer a chance to offer subscriptions to its more than 200 million customers and cross-sell goods to Conde Nast subscribers with the easy ‘one-click’ purchasing system.

“It’s part of the Amazon initiative to improve its overall content portfolio,” said R.J. Hottovy, an analyst at Morningstar. “It’s a matter of getting more people to Amazon. It entices them to make more purchases elsewhere on Amazon, which should have some revenue and margin improvement opportunities.”

But it is just one piece of Amazon’s ever-growing business, and likely not the lynchpin of any grand new strategy.

“It’s a pretty small agreement in the grand scheme of things for Amazon,” said Aaron Kessler at Raymond James. “But it’s definitely a positive if Amazon can become the backbone for more digital subscriptions.”

Analysts said it would make sense for Amazon to target other publishers’ subscription services, but the company declined to give details about its plans.

An obvious target would The Washington Post, which Amazon Chief Executive Jeff Bezos bought for $250 million earlier this month.

THE PLAN

Conde Nast will offer readers a combined $6 introductory rate for six months of both the online and print versions of one of the following magazines: Vogue, Glamour, Bon Appetit, Lucky, Golf Digest, Vanity Fair and Wired.

It plans to add its other 11 consumer titles, including the New Yorker, later in the year.

Readers can still subscribe the old way through Conde Nast, and can also subscribe online through existing partner Apple Inc.

The digital subscriptions will be made available on several mobile platforms, including the Kindle Fire, Apple’s iPad and Google Inc’s Android tablets and phones.

It will introduce Conde Nast to new readers through Amazon’s massive customer base.

“We are using the partnership with Amazon to make purchasing and renewing subscriptions as easy as humanly possible,” Bob Sauerberg, president of Conde Nast, said in an interview last Wednesday.

“We want to go from selling print subscriptions to selling access to all our content,” he added, referring to the introductory offer that allows readers to get online and print subscriptions bundled together for individual titles.

Currently, online readers count for only about 4 percent of Conde Nast’s total circulation of about 18.5 million copies, according to the Alliance for Audited Media. That suggests the glossy magazine as a physical object is not likely to disappear any time soon.

“Magazines have real deep value in both formats,” said Russ Grandinetti, vice president of Kindle Content at Amazon. “A lot of consumers want to keep one foot in both camps.”

STRIKING DEALS

Sauerberg and Grandinetti started to talk about a potential partnership over breakfast during the magazine trade organization MPA’s annual conference last year.

“For years we have worked hard at trying to make buying anything really easy,” Grandinetti said. “Even though people really love magazines, I would not say they love the process of maintaining their subscription.”

Increasing digital copies is a key part of the magazine’s industry future success as more people choose to read on smartphones and tablets, while advertisers are placing more dollars toward digital displays at the expense of print.

At the same time, mobile device makers have a huge appetite for media content, including magazines, newspapers and TV shows to spur people to buy tablets and smartphones.

Bezos’ move to buy The Washington Post ignited speculation that he would transform the paper into a streaming news service delivered to tablets, computers and phones. Grandinetti would not comment on any plans involving the Post, adding that the paper is solely under Bezos’ ownership.

Even as tech companies court publishers, media companies have had an uneasy relationship with Silicon Valley since watching the music industry dwindle as people flocked to buy songs on iTunes for much less than the price of a CD.

For example, Time Inc, a division of Time Warner Inc, the largest magazine publisher in the United States, was one of the last holdouts to join Apple’s newsstand. The standoff was because the world’s largest technology company did not want to share subscriber data with the publisher of Sports Illustrated and People.

Subscriber information is critical to magazine publishers, who use it to give advertisers a better picture about their readers.

Conde Nast is usually one of the first to wade into the water with innovations. For instance, it was the first to offer subscriptions through Apple’s newsstand with the New Yorker.

“We really try and connect with the tech companies on the West Coast,” Sauerberg said. “We know what we’re good at and they know what they are good at.”

In the agreement with Amazon, Sauerberg said Amazon is providing the same consumer data Conde Nast would get when a reader subscribes directly through the company.

Amazon is taking a cut of the subscription revenue, although both companies declined to provide details. In other arrangements, Amazon typically takes 30 percent.

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Adobe DPS Release 27

The latest release of Digital Publishing Suite – Release 27 – is now available. With support for Pinterest, device GPS integration and Free Article Preview with Metering, the latest features in Digital Publishing Suite are designed to help you drive awareness of, interest in, and revenue from your publications. In addition, we have refined Folio Producer Service so that you can streamline and accelerate production.

New features that are now available, in release 27, among others:

  • Social Sharing through Pinterest
  • Device GPS Integration
  • Free Article Preview with Metered Content
  • Copy Folio

For a full list of features available in release 27, visit Bob Bringhurst’s Help Site, What’s New in this Release.

Pinterest Added to Social Sharing
Socially sharing images has become mainstream, and DPS apps lend themselves to this medium since they are often well designed with striking visuals. In addition to existing social sharing functionality, you can now allow readers to share the image of an article page on their Pinterest boards. Their followers can be hooked in by great visuals and subsequently experience the interactive and informational content in your app, such as recipes, infographics, fashion, and home improvement techniques. The goal with this feature is to increase the reach of your content through your readers’ social networks. With this capability, corporate publishers can drive brand awareness and magazine and newspaper publishers can develop new readership. Available for iPad and iPhone.

The following visuals illustrate the flow of the Pinterest reading experience in DPS.

  1. A reader shares the image of an article page from the app and posts it on her Pinterest page.
  2. Her follower clicks on the Pinterest image.
  3. Once the image is open, she clicks on “Visit Website.”
  4. After clicking, readers can experience interactive article content on device or in the Web Viewer.

Device GPS Integration
Mobile readers are exactly that: mobile. Your consumers are reading content on the bus, at home, and at work, in different geographies and locations. You may need to deliver different types of content to people based on location. GPS integration allows you to deliver targeted content through integration with GPS location data from the device.  Available for iPad and iPhone.

Consider the following use cases:

  • Promotional Entitlement Banner Enterprise customers can place a geo-specific promotional banner in the custom store or library. For example, if you’re sponsoring an event in Los Angeles, you can promote a free folio to each attendee in LA by showing a targeted banner. When users click on the banner, they can enter login credentials and be entitled to the folio. This allows you to connect with the audience and capture data from attendees. Once attendees download the folio, they remain entitled to it after they leave Los Angeles. The geolocation does not change the content that they are entitled to, but only changes the banner that they see in the custom store or library.
  • Region-specific folios  If you have a sales enablement app, you may want to entitle sales team members to region-specific content, such as lists of pricing, regional distributors, and retail locations. For example, your U.S. sales team will see a different set of folios in their library from the Latin America sales team. As in the use case above, if a rep downloads a folio from the U.S. and then travels to Latin America, the folios downloaded in the U.S. will still be available on her device. Requires custom store or library.
  • Region specific article or ad  The first two use cases cover GPS integration with the custom store or library. In this use case, you can change content within the article based on geography. For example, you may have an article on farmers markets, and want to provide HTML content on local markets. In the case of an advertisement, GPS integration allows you feature local vendors to help drive regional sales. In the image below, the advertiser is a European railroad company that has different travel agents in each U.S. city.

Free Article Preview with Metered Content 
In our last release, we enabled Free Article Preview, allowing publishers to pique reader interest by providing selected free articles in a folio, and offering upsell or subscription prompts once consumers click on a protected article. Previously, articles were either designated as “free” or “protected” in the Folio Producer Service. As promised in Colin Fleming’s Release 26 video on Free Article Preview, you can now set up an additional content type — “metered” — and define a certain number of articles available for free to engage readers before encouraging them to purchase premium content. Once readers encounter the paywall, convert them into buyers with subscription and upsell prompts.

The following images show samples of metered content and upsell prompts.

Copy Folio 
In release 27, production staff can also streamline the production process and improve collaboration with new Copy Folio functionality. With this feature, you can copy an entire folio to your account using one-click access from the Folio Producer Service, eliminating the need to copy and rebuild a folio article-by-article. Production staff can insert content, including editorial and advertising, from content contributors and agencies more easily with this streamlined Copy Folio workflow. In addition, you can automate folio copying with access to the Copy Folio API. Watch the Copy Folio video from Colin Fleming on Adobe TV.