How Brands are Becoming Media Companies Through Strategy, Publishing, and Amplification

shoutThe consumer decision journey has changed forever and therefore so has media.

Consumers now expect brands to be where they are, when they are, in the format they expect, and on the device they are using at the time. As a result, information is simultaneously found, shared, read, seen, heard and watched as awareness is being generated and decisions are being formed.

Traditional media is being disrupted and becoming more digital. At the same time, content marketing, search and social are being elevated into more integral parts of holistic digital marketing campaigns.

As traditional media and content marketing converge, there lies the perfect storm for brands to become publishers and storytellers across all channels and platforms.

Through owned, earned and paid media, brands now have an unprecedented opportunity to connect with their audience and transform into media companies.

An Example

Digital mediums such as YouTube are evolving much faster than traditional TV. Brands are using these digital mediums to connect with their audience in a more personalised way – just as consumers now expect.

Take this video from Coke for example.

The comments are all generally positive, such as:

“Well done guys, the idea with bottles and glasses is great. Could be good ad for coke 🙂 ”

“I usually skip all the publicity on this site, but this time was different, I give it a chance and it amazed me. I hope Coca Cola give you guys a big $ for this, because this is golden.”

It’s a world where people actually want to consume and share branded content.

 

Content Marketing to Become Content Brands

There are three areas of focus needed to help brands become media companies: strategy, publishing and amplification.

1. Strategy

Entire books have been written about strategy so of course we can’t cover it all here. One important rule we follow is to never create strategy in a vacuum.

It’s vital to fuse your market research, SEO, content, publishing and amplification strategies into one. If you do SEO without publishing you end up link building instead of link earning. If you do amplification without market research you end up potentially promoting to the wrong audience in the wrong place at the wrong time.

The following items must be considered when developing an effective content strategy:

Voice and tone
Style guidelines and branding
Personas – audience demographics and psychographics
Organic search
Keywords
CMS/technical
Trust signals
Content plan – channel integration
Social and community
Brand sentiment
Customer loyalty
A proper content marketing strategy that incorporates market research, SEO, brand publishing, and amplification will drive leads while improving search and social as channels.

 

2. Brand Publishing

In order for brands to connect with their consumers across fragmented digital mediums, they have to become storytellers. To effectively become a brand publisher they need processes, talent, technology and great content.

The significance of the content producer is most evident in Google and Twitter. Google updated its Agent Rank algorithm in 2011, and launched Google+, which they’ve defined as their social network, and identity service. Google’s algorithm is now asking “who” is creating the content and how influential is that producer within his or her niche. In mid-2012 Google began displaying rich snippets including the author’s name and picture in search results for more than 20 percent of all keyword searches. This illustrates Google’s use of authorship as a strong trust signal and one that should, and will, become more prominent.

 

3. Content Amplification
The industry has exploded with incredible companies and platforms to help brands amplify their content. We’ve partnered with many, if not most, of the companies in the content discovery space and native advertising so that we can help brands get in front of the right audience at the right time. Content amplification makes all content, search, and social efforts more productive, leading to increased visibility, engagement, and revenue. Content amplification is conducted through earned media/digital PR and paid media.

Earned Media/Digital PR

Earned media relates to all marketing and PR that benefits a brand’s visibility without the cost of advertising. Earned media occurs naturally, but can be amplified further through targeted content placement and influencer outreach.

Content Placement – Integrate brand citations and links within relevant stories published on targeted third party publications.
Influencer Outreach – Promote corporate product content and publication content to reputable influencers within the industry or related verticals and design custom engagement plans for promotion.

Paid Media

Paid media represents all forms of digital advertising and is effective at reaching an audience that may be otherwise unreachable.

Access your search audience where you are lacking visibility in organic rankings. Information gathered from Paid Search can fuel current and future strategies. With keywords mapped properly to customer need and intent, ad copy can be hyper-targeted to satisfy customer needs, and landing page optimisation can further improve conversions.

Expose brand messaging and publication content to an ultra- targeted audience. Paid social is excellent at driving awareness on a new product or brand asset.

Native Advertising – Drive publication content impressions through category relevant publishing outlets to increase readership, social fans, and brand advocates. Display & Retargeting – Remind consumers of the brand through calculated display retargeting. This tactic becomes more impactful with brand publishing as users can be influenced from awareness to interest, desire and action.
Similar to traditional public relations, the intent of amplification is to get your strategic and coordinated brand message in front of your audience and consumer at the right time and in the right place. When executed properly, amplification and continuous, yet appropriate, stimulation of your audience and customers will lead them through the purchase funnel.

 

So what does all this mean?

The big buzzword in the marketing world right now is ‘content marketing’.

You may have heard it nefariously operating under various names: Custom publishing, custom media, customer media, customer publishing, private media, branded content, corporate media, corporate publishing, corporate journalism and branded media. However it all boils down to the same thing: creating engaging content that attracts, engages and builds a relationship with an audience which may make a purchase in time.

As with any marketing practice – the definitions of content marketing are manifold and expansive – however, Joe Pulizzi, founder of the Content Marketing Institute, sums up the ethos as:

“Your customers don’t care about you, your products, your services… they care about themselves, their wants and their needs. Content marketing is about creating interesting information your customers are passionate about so they actually pay attention to you”.

Regardless of the moniker du jour – content marketing represents a massive shift in thinking for brands who have historically placed great stock against the interruptive marketing of yore.

Traditionally, brands – in a bid to capture attention – have interrupted consumers to talk about their product; when you’re reading a magazine – you see an ad; if you’re watching TV – you see a commercial; when you’re online – you get a pop-up. Each of these interruptions is an unsolicited marketing message from a brand that you may or may not give two hoots about.

30 years ago, market research firm Yankelovich estimated that the typical city-dweller was subject to 2,000 of these marketing messages a day. When Yankelovich revisited the study in 2008 this number had grown to 5,000.

Consumer research continually highlights that most of these marketing message are irrelevant to their current interests and needs. More importantly, each of us now has increasing control over what marketing we receive from brands; we can opt-out of telemarketing and direct-mail; unsubscribe from email; skip TV ads; and so forth.

The antidote to this has been for brands to start seeking ‘permission’ to gain consumers’ attention. And what better way to gain permission to get someone’s attention than when they are actually looking for you. Or at least something you can help with.

Content marketing has emerged then as means to reach people who are continually looking for information, entertainment or help. Brands can use content marketing to pull people in who aren’t necessarily interested in a specific product but instead meeting a need-state behind the product purchase.

There are many standout examples of content marketing. These include, L’Oreal which has Makeup.com – a site that talks about style and beauty issues without overtly pushing L’Oreal’s own product line; General Mills offers dieting advice and tips at Tablespoon.com; Red Bull has created Red Bulletin – a high-octane magazine for thrill-seekers and sports fanatics; American Express have created Open Forum – a portal of helpful articles which cover issues faced by small business owners.

In none of these examples are the brands explicitly saying buy this, buy that, buy now. Rather, they are publishing and distributing content that engages and attracts customers and prospects and enables their lifestyles. It is lifestyle-centric rather than product-centric.

For sure, forward-thinking major brands have been doing content marketing for decades. One famous example is the Michelin Guide which was originally written in 1900 by Michelin tire founders and brothers Andre and Edouard Michelin, the original publication consisted of 35,000 free guides that included practical information, travel tips, and maps to vehicle fuel and service stations. Since then, these guides been used by warring soldiers and tourists alike and have grown to considerable prestige as an authority in destination travel and restaurant suggestions.

However, it is the rate, ubiquity and variety of content marketing – especially online – that has shown the how far content marketing as a practice has come.

We are increasingly living in a world where content is king and great way to steal and hold attention. Because you have chosen to read this article – you have elected to concentrate your interest here, rather than elsewhere. There is no doubt the information we read has an impact on what we think, what we do – and most importantly for a brand – what we buy. And this is why brands are now rushing to become publishers.

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Digital Publishing Industry in China Expected To Earn $57.74 billion in 2014

chinaDigitization process is on the upswing in China where digital publishing is being accorded far greater emphasis than any time before. The rapid emergence of internet and digital technologies has only acted as a catalyst to the digital transformation process. If the above trend is put in financial terms, the figures are astounding to say the least. For instance, the compounded annual growth rate (CAGR) from digital publishing over the period of 2002 – 2012 stands at an impressive 61.6 percent. Further, the total revenue generated by the Chinese digital publishing industry stands at an astounding $42.89 billion for 2013. The same is predicted to reach even more astounding $57.74 billion in 2014. To further add impetus to the digitization process, China has set up the first batch of what it calls as the digital publishing transformation demonstration institutions. There are 70 such institutions set up so far though more of these will come in place this year. The first digital publishing industry base – the Shanghai Zhangjiang National Digital Publishing Base was set up in 2008 followed by more such bases in Chongqing, Hangzhou, Hubei and Hunan. The country already boasts of a dozen such national digital publishing industry bases.

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technical specifications for the ADOBE .folio coming up in Q1 2014 under free license

Adobe has let it known that they will be coming up with the technical specifications of .folio format for e-magazines under free license sometime in Q1 2014. An inherent benefit of the .folio format is that it will allow newsstands to launch their own viewing apps for users to read digital magazines that have been built using Adobe’s Digital Publishing Suite. This, Adobe claims will lead to greater acceptance of digital magazines published using Adobe DPS which has already seen three times the growth achieved in 2013 as it has been the year before it.

What is also heartening for Adobe is that readers have been found to engage with the publications, with them tending to spend about 50 mins on average with DPS digital magazines in a month. Cost efficiency and ease of use of DPS has been attributed to the success of the digital publishing platform though also contributing significantly to the success story are the consumer marketing tools that are an integral package of DPS magazine apps. These features include the ability for readers to share articles using the social networking sites, feature that allows a particular article or an entire issue to be previewed for free and so on.

But what will change effectively for publishers and brands who want to adopt this de-facto standard? This free license will enable any newsstand licensee to implement its own .folio viewer. At this moment the only available viewer for .folios was the ADOBE Viewer, hence the big change.


In Germany Digital Publishing is No Longer Satan, But Saviour

BERLIN: A month after the Frankfurt Book Fair, where German publishing declared it was “the year of the start-up,” the two day E-PUBLISH conference took place last week in Berlin. Several keynote speeches and smaller ‘table sessions’ continued the book branch’s focus on start-ups and innovation in digital publishing, with topics like entrepreneurship, new business and pricing models such as subscriptions, as well as the BUDIP award for innovation. In addition, the violinist Seth Schwarz opened both days of the conference with his electric violin and loop machine. His mash-ups of electronic, hip-hop and classical music set the mood for debates about innovation and multimedia.

Reader Relationships Central

Several speakers touched on the changing role of the author. Dr. Gunter Faltin (Free University) compared self publishing to the fair trade movement, highlighting how “cutting out the middleman” enables authors to create one-on-one relationships with readers. The evening speaker, Dirk von Gehlen, journalist and writer of Eine neue Version ist verfügbar (a new version is available), emphasized the importance of connecting with readers by drawing from his own experience with crowdfunding. By crowdfunding, authors can share the writing process with readers, which means that readers are not just buying a book, but the experience of seeing how a book comes into being.

The German Book Prize winning author Katharina Hacker introduced the new author collective Fiktion, which started with a declaration. As a laboratory for international authors, Fiktion wants to radically rethink ebook distribution. For instance Hacker asked “Does free access lead to the destruction of traditional payment structures, or help authors to (re) discover readers?” They hope to develop solutions through collaboration — both with authors, universities and lawyers. Hacker expressed that fiction writers are increasingly worried that changing media consumption makes readers less able to concentrate on complex, long texts. She said: “we aren’t concerned that content can be distributed for free online, circumventing us, but that our way of writing and thinking is being marginalized.” While she didn’t offer any concrete solutions, like other participants in this year’s E:PUBLISH conference she emphasized the necessity for experimentation, being open to new approaches and not being afraid of failure.

As self-publishing is on the rise in Germany, there was much also debate about how publishers can prove their value to authors. Elisabeth Ruge, head of Hanser Berlin, emphasized that publishers shouldn’t forget the importance of sharpening their own profile. Another workshop group concluded that book publishers have to increasingly become service providers, topic scouts and community managers. In other words, the focus has to be on serving authors and appealing to readers with relevant content.

Schauermacher

Manuela Schauerhammer challenged publishers to use digital mediums for more inclusivity in kids books: “Why not portray a choice of body types or ethnic backgrounds?” she asked.

Rethinking Formats

Many presenters also concentrated on the future of formats. ePub 3 and interactive formats, such as the Tiger format for animated children’s books, were widely discussed. In one keynote, the blogger and children’s book expert Manuela Schauerhammer shared her experience on how kids read in the digital era. For instance, older kids consider animated books to be too childish. Several school kids told Schauermacher they preferred to work online as opposed to with ebooks: “I’d rather work online, where I can click to other websites, copy text, watch videos.” Finally, Schauermacher made a case for using digital mediums more inclusively — why not portray more children with different body types or ethnic backgrounds? Why not offer more bilingual ebooks? She concluded with the appeal that “the internet is international — cooperate with digital.”

New Approaches, New Business Models

At the conference a number of new approaches to digital publishing were also discussed. The CEO of GRIN Verlag, Christian Damke, said that publishers have to realize they are “IT companies with a cultural mission.” GRIN and their partner marketing agency Bilandia help publishers develop content strategies in which all channels work together as part of one unified “ecosystem.”

‘Digital first’ publishing was also on everyone’s minds. Ebook only publishers such as DotbooksCulturBooks and Sobooks (a browser-based e-book store and publisher) were often mentioned as examples of true innovation in publishing. Dotbooks offers “XXL-sized book excerpts”, as they’ve seen that readers are more likely to buy a book after reading up to 40% of it. The digital first publishers can more quickly adapt to the demands of a rapidly changing marketplace. Those which sell directly — such as Sobooks plans to do – see the benefits in owning customer relationships and the data about their target groups’ reading habits.

Agentme took the prize for best startup.

Agentme took the prize for best startup.

Start-up Prize

E:PUBLISH also awarded the BUDIP prize (Buch Digitale Innovation Pitch) for innovative ideas in digital publishing. The candidates had to propose ideas to the jury in 3-minute blitz presentations. They offered a variety of creative solutions, from the “emo-meter,” which could recommend books based on mood, to Blinkist, an app which lets users read bite-sized articles based on nonfiction books as a way of discovering new reads. This year’s prize was awarded to Dennis Brunotte for agentme, a platform which connects authors, agents and editors to sell rights internationally.

Changing Attitudes

Overall, E:PUBLISH 2013 provided few hard facts about the state of digital publishing in the German market. Instead, the gathering captured publishers’ and authors’ yearning for change and gave a good sense of the mood in the industry. Beyond ‘start-up fever’, many publishers still have reservations about how to create sustainable business models in the changing market. As von Gehlen mentioned, since digital largely solves the “problem of scarcity” in the arts, it’s more difficult to monetize that content. As cultural products shift more and more to being experience-based, book publishers need to change tack in order to offer more added value. In table session conversations, many suggested adding additional functions to e-books to make them more appealing. However, other participants recognized this product-based thinking as problematic. Do readers really want extra frills, or simply the opportunity to interact and connect?

One side comment was particularly telling. A participant explained the Wattpad business model as “a publisher which only consists of a technical platform, and they don’t even want to make money!” While this is a gross understatement at best, it aptly captures the gap in thinking between traditional publishing models and online publishing. At the same time, projects like Sobooks and Flipintuacknowledge that book publishing needs to learn a lesson or two from online models in order to remain relevant and user-friendly — which even school children recognize.

At the E:PUBLISH conference one could sense the excitement and curiosity about what lies ahead for German publishing. Many echoed the statement of Günter Faltin, who emphasized that “innovation needs to come from outside” the industry. This year’s conference hosted a variety of newcomers. Yet the question remains: will a changing of the guard be enough to create a large-scale shift in publishers’ attitudes, or will ‘digital first’ thinking remain the territory of authors, start-ups, and industry outsiders?

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Android tablet gains in market share does not seem to be translating into dollars for publishers, at least not yet

The common wisdom among publishers and digital publishing solution providers has been that when developing new tablet editions one should develop for iOS first, then Android and other platforms. The reason at first was simply that Apple was first with a popular tablet, and their sales dwarfed the competition. But as more Android, and then Kindle Fire, tablets appeared in the market the reason shifted somewhat: publishers were still seeing far more sales, more paid subscriptions from iPad owners than from owners of other tablets.

january2010-AppleThe theory for why this was true was that Apple had the top end of the market, first adopters, and those with more disposable income. Apple also had a system that allowed for easy purchases – and they also had all those credit cards on file.

But things have changed in the past year or so. Amazon.com launched the Kindle Fire for the holiday season and along with the tablet came a whole infrastructure that resembled Apple’s. Just as iPad owners were used to buying music and movies from iTunes, Kindle Fire owners were used to buying books and other goods from Amazon.com.

Nonetheless, there remains big differences in the way the various platforms are used and the kinds of publications seen inside the app stores. Replica editions are everywhere, but interactive magazines are more often found in Apple’s ecosystem. Many new tablet magazine vendors continue to choose to launch their solutions first for iOS and only later for Android and Windows. TNM’s own survey of digital publishing platform companies shows that close to 25 percent still do not provide solutions that will result in an app for the Google Play store – and close to 75 percent don’t service the Windows environment.

But surely we are starting to see this change, right? With so many new Kindle tablets being sold, with the soon to be released Kindle Fire HDX around the corner, are we seeing, or at least anticipating a change to the market?

YutakaTsutano-iPadCase

Photo by Yutaka Tsutano (used under Creative Commons license)

“What we see is that there is still very much a stickiness to the iOS platform,” Alex Gruntsev, Chief Innovation Officer, NewspaperDirect, said.

Gruntsev said that the iPad reached people who were early adopters. He sees Android tablets, though, as being in the same category as the iPad, but that users remain more price sensitive.

“Amazon is moving the needle now,” said Graham Farrar of zuuka Group, the maker of the iStoryTime apps and bookstore app. “Which is not a surprise to me, if there is one Amazon know how to do is run a store.”

“As the Kindle Fire, and I think the Kindle Fire HDX, will accelerate this (growth),” Farrar said, though “it’s not iOS money yet.”

“When the Kindle Fire was released about 18 months ago I think that spurred additional uses of devices,” said Lynly Schambers, Group Product Marketing Manager, Digital Publishing Suite, Adobe, “because they were that much more affordable and accessible to people.”

“What we’ve seen, when we look at the growth of the Digital Publishing Suite business, we’ve seen the number of downloads really accelerate, especially over the past six to 12 months,” Schambers said.

Mike Haney of Mag+ said he thinks there may be regional differences, as well.

“I have read that there are real regional differences here—where Android is much more common in Europe and other parts of the world, users tend to spend more,” Haney said. “I hear that many of our customers are having good success on the Kindle, where people are more accustomed to buying content, particularly content to read.”

“I don’t know how soon, but the trend seems to be that like app spending everywhere, spending on Android is picking up, not slowing down. Google has done some nice work in improving the layout and features of its app store, and as more of those Android users—who may not have consciously purchased an Android phone, but rather took the least expensive smartphone their carrier offered—”discover” apps on their device, I think we’ll see spending steadily increasing, even if the price per app or per in-app purchase is driven down,” Haney said.

“We are seeing an increase in the number of people that are willing to pay for content, especially when we look at that year over year,” Adobe’s Schambers said. “Just in the past 12 months we’ve seen the number of digital subscriptions, paid for digital subscription increase almost three times over the past 12 months.”

For Gruntsev from NewspaperDirect, he sees a big difference between what readers are willing to pay for on tablets, and online.

“People are not willing to pay for repurposed web content,” Gruntsev said. “The moment they see replica for some reason it triggers comparison to the print.” (And hence a willingness to pay.)

KindleFire-apps-lg

For Haney from Mag+ he still puts the emphasis on the need to think of the new digital publications fresh.

“Our advice is unequivocally that you need to think of your presence on a tablet or smartphone app as a new product, not just a version of an existing product,” Haney said. “It is a unique ecosystem, with unique usage patterns and unique user needs.”

“If you run a monthly magazine and your publisher asks you to make a book, you wouldn’t just slap a hard cover on the July issue and call it done, would you?”

Haney also says that publishers need to understand that on tablet devices, as elsewhere, they are competing for the attention of the user. “Your replica that you clearly put no effort into is not going to lure me away from Zite or Facebook. ut if you give me a compelling bundle of content that is engaging and easy to consume and fits what I do with that device — Atlantic Weekly being a great example — then you will become part of my app habit.”

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A third read tablet magazines ‘cover to cover’

Esquire: Hearst's tablet edition
Esquire: Hearst’s tablet edition
Almost one third of consumers read tablet editions of magazines “cover to cover” and few jump around apps using interactive tools, according to research from Hearst Magazines UK released to Media Week today.Hearst used an in-app survey in digital editions of Harper’s Bazaar, Men’s Health, Red, Elle, Cosmopolitan and Esquire to quiz nearly 500 readers on their reading preferences for digital editions.Of the people questioned, 31.4 per cent said they read a digital issue “cover to cover” in a linear manner.In contrast, only 7.3 percent said they scrolled through small thumbnails of the pages to navigate the app, while 6.4 per cent use navigation features on the front cover or contents section to jump to certain articles.On average, readers claimed to pick up a digital copy and read it four times per issue and read an average of 67.8 per cent of their copy.

In comparison, print readers claimed to read 76.2 per cent of a print copy of a magazine according to the Quality of Reading survey from the Professional Publishers’ Association (then the Periodical Publishers Association) in 2000.

Consumers claimed to spend 103 minutes reading the digital edition, nearly double the amount of time readers claimed to spend on a print issue in the separate PPA research 13 years ago.

When asked what features would enhance advertising, the top two choices were a clickable link to find more about a product (chosen by 30.7 per cent as a feature they would definitely like in advertising) and photo galleries (27 per cent).

Max Raven, the group revenue director of Hearst Magazines UK, said: “Developing robust digital edition metrics and ensuring our advertisers and clients have the utmost confidence in our data is top priority.”

The research also found that 69.1 per cent keep a digital magazine for future reference, while only 11.3 per cent delete it.

Nearly half (45.7 per cent) claimed they intended to buy a mixture of print and digital issues in future.

The digital editions used were enhanced editions, re-designed for devices like iPad and iPhones, rather than a digital version of the print magazine created from PDF files.

Respondents surveyed had a medium age of 37. The survey suggested uptake of digital editions is still on the rise, as 23 per cent of those surveyed were first-time buyers of the edition. The largest proportion (48 per cent) was subscribers.

Hearst claims to be the largest digital publishing in the UK – added together, its digital editions have a larger circulation than any other publisher, according to the latest Audit Bureau of Circulations figures.

In September Hearst launched an Esquire Weekly app edition, a digital weekly edition of the monthly men’s magazine, priced at 99p.

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Elsevier selects Inkling’s digital platform for Expert Consult and Student Consult

PHILADELPHIA, SEPTEMBER 9, 2013 — /PRNewswire/ —

Medical education and reference content to be enhanced by new, intuitive digital platform

Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, has selected Inkling, the creator of engaging, intuitive digital books for some of the world’s most respected publishers, to power the next generation of its popular Expert Consult andStudent Consult medical reference and medical learning platforms.

All of Elsevier’s leading medical reference and learning content will be available through Inkling’s standard-setting reading and search experience. Both existing and new users will enjoy easy search, consistent structure, rich media, social and community features, and seamless electronic access from any device.

“This is a big step forward in the transition from print to digital publishing,” said Matt MacInnis, Founder and CEO of Inkling. “We’re migrating this valuable knowledge to a more flexible, more searchable format and, in doing so, making it possible to build whole new ways for people to find knowledge. Clearly, this is what tech-savvy physicians and medical students demand.”

As part of this agreement, Elsevier will bring more than 650 leading medical titles to Inkling and will use Inkling Habitat, the industry-leading cloud publishing platform, to build and manage this content so that it’s consistently structured, searchable, and easily updated. Expert Consult and Student Consult users will enjoy the Inkling features medical professionals and students around the globe have come to expect – truly interactive content that brings new meaning to illustrations, and allows readers’ annotations to travel across their devices and be shared with others.

Current Expert Consult and Student Consult users will be automatically upgraded to the new experience. New and returning customers can buy access to specific topics, individual chapters, and complete content sets directly on ExpertConsult.com and StudentConsult.com. In addition, customers who choose to buy physical books will also be granted access to the digital experience. No matter how customers choose to buy and use their medical content, the improved Expert Consult and Student Consult experience will enhance the way they find and learn from medical knowledge.

“Inkling’s technology platform, coupled with our extensive library of medical content, paves an exciting path forward for how we curate and distribute medical knowledge,” said Linda Belfus, Senior Vice President for Content, Elsevier. “We believe our customers will appreciate the interactivity, robust features and functionality, and convenience of the new Expert and Student Consult platforms.”

The content will also be available for purchase through Inkling.com alongside the existing catalog of Elsevier medical content. Inkling plans to roll out hundreds of additional digital titles, ranging from oncology to psychiatry, pediatrics to emergency medicine, and more, throughout 2013.

The new Expert Consult and Student Consult experiences will be available early in the first quarter of 2014.

About Inkling

Inkling is a pioneer in cloud publishing, reimagining the book and providing the technology to organize and distribute expert knowledge. Through Inkling, the world’s leading publishers are building their best content into interactive and engaging experiences. Inkling is moving an entire industry forward, creating the infrastructure to transform words on paper into content in the cloud. Based in San Francisco, Inkling is backed by Sequoia Capital and partners with the world’s leading publishers. For more information, visit http://www.inkling.com.

About Elsevier

Elsevier is a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services. The company works in partnership with the global science and health communities to publish more than 2,000 journals, including The Lancet and Cell, and close to 20,000 book titles, including major reference works from Mosby and Saunders. Elsevier’s online solutions includeScienceDirectScopusSciValReaxysClinicalKey and Mosby’s Suite, which enhance the productivity of science and health professionals, helping research and health care institutions deliver better outcomes more cost-effectively.

A global business headquartered in Amsterdam, Elsevier employs 7,000 people worldwide. The company is part of Reed Elsevier Group plc, a world leading provider of professional information solutions. The group employs more than 30,000 people, including more than 15,000 in North America. Reed Elsevier Group plc is owned equally by two parent companies, Reed Elsevier PLC and Reed Elsevier NV.

Their shares are traded on the London, Amsterdam and New York Stock Exchanges using the following ticker symbols: London: REL; Amsterdam: REN; New York: RUK and ENL.

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